Browse Items (682 total)

Digital reproduction. 1 photograph in 2 formats : digital, TIFF (5,864,920 bytes) and JPG (843,565 bytes) files, grayscale40 GHz, 3.39 GHz CPU; Epson Expression 1640XL flatbed scanner; Silverfast Ai 5 scanning software, Adobe Photoshop 7.0 editing software; 762 dpi, 8-bit grayscale. Master image saved as .tif file; access image saved at 762 dpi as .jpg file. Image file names: B063.01.0035.0001.tif, B063.01.0035.0001.jpg. Portrait of Ben Glass (at left) and H. Leivick (the pen name of Leyv?ik? Halpern), Yiddish poet. Both men were patients at the Jewish Consumptives' Relief Society (JCRS). Title from back of photograph. "Patients of JCRS"-- Handwritten on back of photograph.

Software: Sound Forge v.6.0 digital audio editor; Goldwave v.4.25/s.02 (for noise reduction); LAME v.3.89 using voice preset. Equipment: Kenwood KX-W4050 tape deck; Santa Cruz Turtle Beach (Voyetra) sound card; Samsung CDRW/DVD SM-308B CD burner. audio/wav Size of master file: 252117110 bytes. Biography: Dr. Arthur C. Jones (1946-) is a senior clinical professor
of psychology at the University of Denver, Denver, Colo.
He received his M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in clinical
psychology at the University of Iowa. He is also a
professional singer and has performed at community causes
and concerts. He authored a book on the psychological
aspects and history of spirituals titled "Wade in the
water: the wisdom of spirituals". He is the founder and
director of the Spirituals Project, a non-profit, tax-
exempt community agency dedicated to exploring the
dimensions of African American spirituals as art form,
tradition and tool, and providing education, concerts, and
exposure to these.
Title from audio cassette cover.
Conducted Aug. 5, 1999, in Houston, TX at the National
Association of Negro Musicians Convention. Self-recorded by Arthur Jones. Accompanied by digital transcript.
As an introduction to the history of the Spirituals
Project, Arthur Jones recounts his early experiences in
music beginning with his participation in the New York
City All City High School Chorus, to his training in and
career as a practicing psychologist, and to his return to
music after 25 years by performing spirituals in
fundraising events. He discusses his compelling need to
educate people on the meanings of spirituals, Southern
religious folk songs created and first sung by African
Americans in slavery. In order to further the education
effort he planned a documentary film on spirituals from
which the Spirituals Project emerged. During the process
of working on the film, he received grants for a national
networking oral history project.

Software: Sound Forge v.6.0 digital audio editor; Goldwave v.4.25/s.02 (for noise reduction); LAME v.3.89 using voice preset. Equipment: Kenwood KX-W4050 tape deck; Santa Cruz Turtle Beach (Voyetra) sound card; Samsung CDRW/DVD SM-308B CD burner. audio/wav Size of master file: 356313088 bytes. Biography: Alma Blackmon was born in Washington, D.C. and learned to
play the piano on her own under the direction of her
father. She attended the teacher's college at Howard
University, receiving her bachelor's and master's degrees
in early childhood education. She began her career as a
kindergarten supervisor in Washington, D.C. at the pre-
school level, but later taught English at Oakwood College
in Huntsville. Ala. She directed the Oakwood College
Aeolians Choir, and traveled with the choir on concert
tours, including a concert in Iron Curtain Romania. While
never receiving any formal degrees in music, she has
received two honorary doctorate degrees. Title supplied by cataloger.
Interviewer: Arthur Jones. Conducted January 8, 2000, in Atlanta, Georgia, at the
Buckhead Community Fellowship.
Alma Blackmon relates her early introduction to music at
the age of five when she taught herself to play the piano.
She discusses how music played an important role in her
life in spite of the fact that her formal education was in
early childhood education. Blackmon describes her most
important contribution, that of director of the Oakwood
College Aeolians, a concert choir representing the United
States as a friendship ambassador to Romania, with a
program comprised of Negro spirituals. She also discusses
the role of spirituals in African American culture, and
the important role that spirituals should play in the
heritage of African American people.

Software: Sound Forge v.6.0 digital audio editor; Goldwave v.4.25/s.02 (for noise reduction); LAME v.3.89 using voice preset. Equipment: Kenwood KX-W4050 tape deck; Santa Cruz Turtle Beach (Voyetra) sound card; Samsung CDRW/DVD SM-308B CD burner. audio/wav Size of master file: 328761494 bytes. Biography: Bennie Williams was born and educated in Marshall, Tex.
She received a Bachelor of Arts Degree in piano from
Bishop College in Marshall, and a Master of Music Degree
in Choral Conducting and Piano from Indiana University at
Bloomington, Ill. She began her teaching career in Dallas,
Tex., and later moved to Denver, Colo. where she taught
vocal music at several schools including Hamilton and
Merrill Middle Schools and George Washington High School.
She was a recipient of an annual award given by the
National Association of Negro Musicians recognizing her
years of contribution to the musical education of young
people, and has served as co-director of the Spirituals
Project Choir. She retired from teaching in 1998. Title supplied by cataloger.
Interviewer: Arthur Jones. Conducted July 10, 1999, in Denver, Colo. Accompanied by digital transcript.
Bennie Williams recounts her early experiences of growing
up, and attending grade school, high school and college in
Marshall, Tex. She discusses how spirituals were an
integral part of the church she attended, but that it was
not until she was in college that she considered the
differences between hymns, spirituals and gospel. She
relates her experiences in teaching spirituals, from
directing high school choirs performing at the Black
Teachers Association meetings in Tex., to teaching in
Denver, Colo. public schools including George Washington
High School and Hamilton Middle School. She discusses the
issue of whether or not students can appreciate a
spiritual without knowing its historical content, and
believes that her students could relate to spirituals in
terms of their own personal experiences and the hope that
spirituals embody.

Software: Sound Forge v.6.0 digital audio editor; Goldwave v.4.25/s.02 (for noise reduction); LAME v.3.89 using voice preset. Equipment: Kenwood KX-W4050 tape deck; Santa Cruz Turtle Beach (Voyetra) sound card; Samsung CDRW/DVD SM-308B CD burner. audio/wav Size of master file: 215154836 bytes. Brazeal Dennard recounts the meaning of spirituals in his life from growing up in Michigan, attending music school at Wayne State University, performing as a singer, and forming the Brazeal Dennard Chorale in Detroit, Mich. in 1972. He describes the components of this organization that include not only a professional chorale, but also youth and community chorales. He discusses the relationship of gospel music to spirituals and the issue of the folk spiritual vs. the concertized spiritual. He also addresses how he sees the spiritual affecting 21st century music. Title supplied by cataloger.
Interviewer: Arthur Jones. Conducted Aug. 5, 1999, in Houston, TX at the National Association of Negro Musicians Convention. Accompanied by digital transcript.
Biography: Brazeal Dennard was born in 1929, grew up in Detroit, Mich., and was given private music lessons by many music
professionals. He attended Wayne State University earning a Master's Degree in Music Education. During his career, he has served as educator, guest conductor, lecturer, and church choirmaster, and is retired supervisor of music for the Detroit Public Schools. In 1972 he formed the Brazeal Dennard Chorale, and in 1985 added a community outreach component, the Brazeal Dennard Community Chorus, along with a youth education component, the Brazeal Dennard Youth Chorale. He has been affiliated with many
organizations including the National Endowment of the Arts, National Association of Negro Musicians, and has served on the Board of Directors of the Detroit Symphony Orchestra.

Software: Sound Forge v.6.0 digital audio editor; Goldwave v.4.25/s.02 (for noise reduction); LAME v.3.89 using voice preset. Equipment: Kenwood KX-W4050 tape deck; Santa Cruz Turtle Beach (Voyetra) sound card; Samsung CDRW/DVD SM-308B CD burner. audio/wav Size of master file: 231219348 bytes. Biography: Born in Arkansas, William Warfield (1920-2002) moved to Rochester, N.Y., with his family. He pursued his undergraduate and graduate studies in voice at the Eastman School of Music in Rochester and established himself as a vocal artist with a recital debut in New York's Town Hall in 1950. In addition to Warfield's musical abilities as a baritone, he was also known for his acting capabilities, with one of his most memorable roles as the title role in George Gershwin's opera Porgy and Bess. He received numerous honors and awards including an honorary Doctor of Laws from the University of Arkansas, an honorary Doctorate from Lafayette University (Easton, PA) for his "Contributions in the Arts", and a "Doctor of Human Letters" from Augustana College in Illinois. He devoted his time to the National Association of Negro Musicians and the Schiller Institute where he conducted voice-training master classes. In 1984 he won a Grammy Award in the "Spoken Word" category for his narration of Aaron Copeland's "A Lincoln Portrait." He served on the faculty of the University of Illinois, and was a professor of voice at Northwestern University prior to his death. Title supplied by cataloger.
Interviewer: Arthur Jones. Conducted Aug. 4, 1999, in Houston, TX at the National Association of Negro Musicians Convention. Accompanied by digital transcript.
William Warfield recounts his early experiences of studying music with well-known artists such as Robert Nathaniel Dett and Paul Robeson, and some of his early performance experiences. He discusses his approach to performing any musical work, including spirituals and classical works, in which he visualizes what the music is saying before and while he performs it. He describes the spiritual as a folk song that is part of the cultural inheritance of all Americans, and believes that the concretized spirituals, or spirituals as art songs, are still a valid expression of the original slave experience. He also describes some of his teaching experiences at Northwestern University and believes that an important part of his calling as an artist was to teach and awaken the artistry of his students.

Software: Sound Forge v.6.0 digital audio editor; Goldwave v.4.25/s.02 (for noise reduction); LAME v.3.89 using voice preset. Equipment: Kenwood KX-W4050 tape deck; Santa Cruz Turtle Beach (Voyetra) sound card; Samsung CDRW/DVD SM-308B CD burner. audio/wav Size of master file: 622586396 bytes. Linda Tillery recounts remembrances of growing up in a family environment imbued with African American music. In spite of this early exposure, however, it was not until she was 41 years old, after her parents died in 1990, that her interest in understanding African American folk music and spirituals deepened. At this time she embarked on an oral history project to study spirituals by researching written and recorded sources found in key U.S. archives and by interviewing primarily older African Americans whom she considered to be the "elders of folk music". While already established as a jazz and blues singer, she changed direction to pursue the quest of understanding and performing the African American art form of spirituals. She discusses how passing the spiritual from generation to generation attains preservation of this music, and believes that the senior members of the African American community who learned it as children from their parents play an important role in the education and preservation of African American folk music. She contends that concertized spirituals, if performed authentically by maintaining their original simplicity, metered hymns, and much of the music performed by quartets, are also in the same vein as spirituals. Title supplied by cataloger.
Interviewer: Arthur Jones. Conducted May 25, 1999, in Oakland, California.
Accompanied by digital transcript.
Biography: Born in San Francisco, Linda Tillery (1948-) established herself as a vocalist, percussionist, producer, vocal coach and cultural historian. She has appeared in over 50 recordings, worked in radio, film, and theater, and served on panels for the National Endowment for the Arts. In 1992 her interests as a researcher, teacher and performer of African American oral music, including spirituals, led her to form a 5 member vocal ensemble, the Cultural Heritage Choir, that continues to perform both in the United States and internationally. As a vocal coach and lecturer she has conducted workshops for many different associations, including St. Mary's College, the Muse Choir of Cincinnati, the Oakland Symphony Chorus, the Oakland Youth Chorus, and the MIT Concert Choir.

Software: Sound Forge v.6.0 digital audio editor; Goldwave v.4.25/s.02 (for noise reduction); LAME v.3.89 using voice preset. Equipment: Kenwood KX-W4050 tape deck; Santa Cruz Turtle Beach (Voyetra) sound card; Samsung CDRW/DVD SM-308B CD burner. audio/wav Size of master file: 378308608 bytes. Biography: Vincent Stringer (1965-) is a baritone and recitalist. After studying voice at the West Hartford School of Music and Dance high school, Stringer attended the New England Conservatory of Music, received a B.A. in Music from Eastern Nazarene College, and completed a Master's Degree in opera at the Longy School of Music in Cambridge. He is the founder and artistic director of the New England Spiritual Ensemble, and is on the voice faculty at Phillips Academy, Andover. He is also an advocate for new music, premiering many works including the Elizabeth Swados cantata, Defiance, commissioned by the U.S. Holocaust Museum in Washington, D.C. Title supplied by cataloger.
Interviewer: Arthur Jones. Conducted May 31, 1999, in Westford, Massachusetts.
Accompanied by digital transcript.
Born in Connecticut of parents from the South, Vincent Stringer recounts his early memories of growing up in a religious, singing family. He discusses his appreciation of spirituals that began in high school after obtaining a scholarship to study voice at the West Hartford School of Music and Dance. He describes his vision of spirituals as possessing an innate divinity and healing power, but believes many African Americans are ashamed of their enslaved past and the spirituals that are associated with it. He describes the founding of the New England Spiritual Ensemble and the role it plays in preserving the heritage of spirituals, both folk and arranged (concretized) versions. He also describes the annual Praise House November meeting he has organized where members of the community rehearse and perform a concert devoted to spirituals.

Software: Sound Forge v.6.0 digital audio editor; Goldwave v.4.25/s.02 (for noise reduction); LAME v.3.89 using voice preset. Equipment: Kenwood KX-W4050 tape deck; Santa Cruz Turtle Beach (Voyetra) sound card; Samsung CDRW/DVD SM-308B CD burner. audio/wav Size of master file: 423049216 bytes. Biography: Hale Smith (1925-) is a free-lance contemporary composer and arranger, and received his B.M. and M.M. degrees from the Cleveland Institute of Music. He is Professor Emeritus of Music at the University of Connecticut(Storrs), and has served on the faculty of the C.W. Post College (Long Island, N.Y.) and as Distinguished Scholar-in-Residence at Xavier College (New Orleans, La.). He has also worked as editor for the music publishers E.B. Marks and Sam Fox, and has received numerous honors and awards, including the Cleveland Arts Prize Music Award. Hale Smith recounts his early experiences with music beginning with piano lessons at the age of 7, and recognizing his desire to create his own music. He discusses his approach to composing, and his belief that there is no single formula for composing. He describes spirituals as folk songs initially composed by individuals, but transformed over time to be the true voice of a people performing them. He contrasts the musical genre of gospels that he believes are most effectively performed and delivered only as part of a church experience, with spirituals that have been successfully transferred to the concert hall. Title supplied by cataloger.
Interviewer: Arthur Jones. Interview conducted June, 1999, in Freeport, NY.
Accompanied by digital transcript.

Software: Sound Forge v.6.0 digital audio editor; Goldwave v.4.25/s.02 (for noise reduction); LAME v.3.89 using voice preset. Equipment: Kenwood KX-W4050 tape deck; Santa Cruz Turtle Beach (Voyetra) sound card; Samsung CDRW/DVD SM-308B CD burner. audio/wav Size of master file: 494571520 bytes. Title supplied by cataloger.
Interviewer: Arthur Jones. Interview conducted May 24, 1999, in Oakland, California.
Accompanied by digital transcript.
Jacqueline Hairston recounts her early experiences with music, beginning with piano lessons at 8, and her appointment as the church music director at 12. She discusses her entree into and early days of arranging spirituals for renowned vocalists such as Leontyne Price and Kathleen Battle, and how she established her reputation as a solo spiritual arranger. She talks about how the concertizing of spirituals has expanded their audience and acceptability, and how this acceptability contributes to the preservation of spirituals. Hairston's approach to concertizing, or arranging, of spirituals is to retain the intent and content of the melodic line, and to incorporate the piano part to glorify it. Biography: Composer/pianist Jacqueline B. Hairston was born in Charlotte, N.C., attended a program at Julliard School of Music for gifted children, then received her Bachelor of Arts in music from Howard University and her Master of Arts from Columbia University. Such groups as the London Symphony Orchestra and Andre Kostelanetz Orchestra have performed her arrangements of spirituals, and many artists including William Warfield and Kathleen Battle have commissioned her to create spiritual arrangements. She was the 1998 Composer in Residence for The Negro Spiritual Foundation in Orlando, Fla., is the former head of the Music Department at Merritt College in Oakland, Calif., and a former Artist in Residence with the Oakland Youth Chorus.

audio/wav Size of master file: 734003200 bytes. Equipment: Kenwood KX-W4050 tape deck; Santa Cruz Turtle Beach (Voyetra) sound card; Samsung CDRW/DVD SM-308B CD burner. Software: Sound Forge v.6.0 digital audio editor; Goldwave v.4.25/s.02 (for noise reduction); LAME v.3.89 using voice preset. The granddaughter of a Pentecostal pastor, Rev. Flunder recounts the experiences of her early years in San
Francisco, and discusses the role music played in her
childhood. She discusses the meaning of spirituals to
early African American slaves, and recounts how these
slaves brought their music and culture with them from
Africa. She also discusses the role of spirituals in the
lives of African Americans today. Rev. Flunder describes
her doctoral work and the dissertation she completed at
San Francisco Theological Seminary on the subject of
ministry to marginalized populations, for example
transgendered people.
Title supplied by cataloger.
Interviewer: Arthur Jones. Interview conducted May 25, 1999 in San Francisco, Calif., at the City of Refuge Congregational Church.
Accompanied by digital transcript.
Biography: Yvette Flunder (1955-) is senior pastor and founder of the City of Refuge Community Church in San Francisco. A native San Franciscan, she graduated from Armstrong College in Georgia, then returned to San Francisco in 1991 and founded the church. She has held positions in many charity organizations in the Bay Area including chairperson of the African American AIDS Coalition of Alameda County, chairperson of the Black Adoption Placement and Research Center, and founding member of the African-American Interfaith Alliance on AIDS. She completed her doctoral degree at the San Francisco
Theological Seminary in 2001.

audio/wav Size of master file: 734003200 bytes. Equipment: Kenwood KX-W4050 tape deck; Santa Cruz Turtle Beach (Voyetra) sound card; Samsung CDRW/DVD SM-308B CD burner. Software: Sound Forge v.6.0 digital audio editor; Goldwave v.4.25/s.02 (for noise reduction); LAME v.3.89 using voice preset. Biography: Francois Clemmons was born in Birmingham, Alabama in 1945, and moved with his family to Youngstown, Ohio, when he was about five years old. He began singing at church and school functions, and earned his Bachelor of Music degree at Oberlin College, and his Master of Fine Arts at Carnegie-Mellon University. He was given the honorary degree of Doctor of Arts in 1996 at Middlebury College in Vermont. As Twilight Artist-In-Residence, he taught music and directed the College Choir. He has enjoyed a successful concert career, and is known his role of "Officer Clemmons" on the television program, "Mister Rogers' Neighborhood". In 1984 he founded the Harlem Spiritual Ensemble, personally financing its operation while it established itself as a professional group on the concert circuit. Title supplied by cataloger.
Interviewer: Arthur Jones. Interview conducted May 29, 1999 in Middlebury, Vt. at Middlebury College.
Accompanied by digital transcript.
Francois Clemmons recounts how music, especially spirituals, has played a prominent role throughout his life, from singing in church and school assemblies, to the founding of the Harlem Spiritual Ensemble. He describes that while he was trained in classical and operatic music, the Ensemble, founded in 1984, filled a personal need in his life not addressed by his successful concert career. He discusses his views on the difference between spirituals and gospel music, the concertizing of spirituals, and relates some of his teaching experiences at Middlebury College.

Known as JCRS and founded in Denver, Colo. in 1904 as a non-sectarian sanatorium to treat, free of charge, tuberculosis patients. One of the leading tuberculosis sanatoria in the country at turn of century started by group of immigrant Eastern European Jewish men, many of whom were victims of TB. Headed by Dr. Charles Spivak as Secretary (1904-1927) and by Dr. Philip Hillkowitz as President (1904-1948), sanatorium treated primarily Jewish patients (notably, Solomon Blumgarten who served as publicity chairman). In 1954 institution changed its mission to cancer research and became American Medical Center; in 1970's renamed AMC Cancer Research Center and Hospital. Today known as AMC Cancer Research Center.
Records highlight tuberculosis treatment, immigration and acculturation, and the growth and development of Colorado's Jewish community.

Epson Expression 836 XL Scanner ; Adobe Photoshop version 5.5. 2853 files ; 300 dpi; 10-150 KB/each file Searchable database of the files of 218 tuberculosis patients who were treated at the Jewish Consumptives' Relief Society, (JCRS) in Denver, Colo. from 1904-1906. Search by patient name, gender, age admitted, place of birth, previous address, occupation, duration of disease, city where disease was contracted, marital status, number of children. Each patient file includes digitized images of correspondence, applications, letters of admittance and release, and invoices for funeral expenses, postcards, as well as legal and financial records.
JCRS was founded in Denver, Colo. in 1904 as a non-sectarian sanatorium to treat, free of charge, tuberculosis patients. One of the leading tuberculosis sanatoria in the country at turn of century started by group of immigrant Eastern European Jewish men, many of whom were victims of TB.

Epson Expression 836 XL Scanner; Adobe Photoshop version 5.5; 300 dpi; 128 files; 300 dpi; 21-31 KB each file Digital image of original annual report published in Denver, Colo. by the Jewish Consumptives' Relief Society, from 1905-?
Illustrated ; 23-26 cm. 1st-?
Chiefly in English, with some Hebrew.
The <3rd- > reports published <1907- > as regular numbered issues of: The Sanatorium, v. <1- >
The 11th and 12th reports(covering 1914-15) issued in combined form as: The Sanatorium ; v. 10, nos. 3/4 (July-Sept./Oct.-Dec. 1916.)
Reports cover the year ending Dec. 31.

Epson Expression 836 XL Scanner with Adobe Photoshop version 5.5 ; image/jpeg, access ; 72 dpi ; 2 files: 16 K bytes, 15 K bytes Collected by Ted Sowers.

Epson Expression 836 XL Scanner with Adobe Photoshop version 5.5 ; image/jpeg, access ; 72 dpi ; 2 files: 19 K bytes, 21 K bytes Collected by Ted Sowers.

Epson Expression 836 XL Scanner with Adobe Photoshop version 5.5 ; image/jpeg, access ; 72 dpi ; 2 files: 26 K bytes, 27 K bytes Collected by Ted Sowers.

Epson Expression 836 XL Scanner with Adobe Photoshop version 5.5 ; image/jpeg, access ; 72 dpi ; 2 files: 22 K bytes, 26 K bytes Collected by Ted Sowers.

Epson Expression 836 XL Scanner with Adobe Photoshop version 5.5 ; image/jpeg, access ; 72 dpi ; 2 files: 18 K bytes, 20 K bytes Collected by Ted Sowers.

Epson Expression 836 XL Scanner with Adobe Photoshop version 5.5 ; image/jpeg, access ; 72 dpi ; 2 files: 18 K bytes, 18 K bytes Collected by Ted Sowers.

Epson Expression 836 XL Scanner with Adobe Photoshop version 5.5 ; image/jpeg, access ; 72 dpi ; 2 files: 17 K bytes, 17 K bytes Collected by Ted Sowers.

Epson Expression 836 XL Scanner with Adobe Photoshop version 5.5 ; image/jpeg, access ; 72 dpi ; 2 files: 18 K bytes, 19 K bytes Collected by Ted Sowers.

Epson Expression 836 XL Scanner with Adobe Photoshop version 5.5 ; image/jpeg, access ; 72 dpi ; 2 files: 18 K bytes, 17 K bytes Collected by Ted Sowers.

Epson Expression 836 XL Scanner with Adobe Photoshop version 5.5 ; image/jpeg, access ; 72 dpi ; 2 files: 18 K bytes, 18 K bytes Collected by Ted Sowers.

Epson Expression 836 XL Scanner with Adobe Photoshop version 5.5 ; image/jpeg, access ; 72 dpi ; 2 files: 17 K bytes, 16 K bytes Collected by Ted Sowers.

Epson Expression 836 XL Scanner with Adobe Photoshop version 5.5 ; image/jpeg, access ; 72 dpi ; 2 files: 20 K bytes, 18 K bytes Collected by Ted Sowers.

Epson Expression 836 XL Scanner with Adobe Photoshop version 5.5 ; image/jpeg, access ; 72 dpi ; 2 files: 18 K bytes, 19 K bytes Collected by Ted Sowers.

Epson Expression 836 XL Scanner with Adobe Photoshop version 5.5 ; image/jpeg, access ; 72 dpi ; 2 files: 14 K bytes, 14 K bytes Collected by Ted Sowers.

Epson Expression 836 XL Scanner with Adobe Photoshop version 5.5 ; image/jpeg, access ; 72 dpi ; 2 files: 17 K bytes, 15 K bytes Collected by Ted Sowers.

Epson Expression 836 XL Scanner with Adobe Photoshop version 5.5 ; image/jpeg, access ; 72 dpi ; 2 files: 17 K bytes, 17 K bytes

Epson Expression 836 XL Scanner with Adobe Photoshop version 5.5 ; image/jpeg, access ; 72 dpi ; 2 files: 17 K bytes, 17 K bytes Collected by Ted Sowers.

Epson Expression 836 XL Scanner with Adobe Photoshop version 5.5 ; image/jpeg,access ; 72 dpi ; 2 files: 31 K bytes, 33 K bytes Gray bag of folded skin; tied with vegetal fiber in two knots
Oklahoma Cave #3, also known as Twin Caves
Site: Cimarron Valley; Kneton Caves; five to seven miles southeast of Kenton.

Epson Expression 836 XL Scanner with Adobe Photoshop version 5.5 ; image/jpeg, access ; 72 dpi ; 2 files: 31 K bytes, 29 K bytes 4 non-human bones.
Material of composition: bone. Site: Snake Blakeslee, Pueblo County; CO Z:8:1

Epson Expression 836 XL Scanner with Adobe Photoshop version 5.5 ; image/jpeg, access ; 72 dpi ; 1 file: 26 K bytes 8 colored stone tools.
Material of composition: stone. Site: WY V:11:1

Epson Expression 836 XL Scanner with Adobe Photoshop version 5.5 ; image/jpeg, access ; 72 dpi ; 2 files: 23 K bytes, 23 K bytes 3 non-human bones.
Material of composition: bone. Site: Snake Blakeslee, Pueblo County; CO Z:8:1

Epson Expression 836 XL Scanner with Adobe Photoshop version 5.5 ; image/jpeg, access ; 72 dpi ; 2 files: 16 K bytes, 17 K bytes 3 snail shells.
Material of composition: shell. Site: Snake Blakeslee, Pueblo County; CO Z:8:1

Epson Expression 836 XL Scanner with Adobe Photoshop version 5.5 ; image/jpeg, access ; 72 dpi ; 2 files: 17 K bytes, 14 K bytes Material of composition: bone. Site: Snake Blakeslee, Pueblo County; CO Z:8:1

Epson Expression 836 XL Scanner with Adobe Photoshop version 5.5 ; image/jpeg, access ; 72 dpi ; 2 files: 17 K bytes, 15 K bytes Collected by Ted Sowers.

Epson Expression 836 XL Scanner with Adobe Photoshop version 5.5 ; image/jpeg, access ; 72 dpi ; 2 files: 18 K bytes, 17 K bytes Collected by Ted Sowers.

Epson Expression 836 XL Scanner with Adobe Photoshop version 5.5 ; image/jpeg, access ; 72 dpi ; 1 file: 19 K bytes Collected by Ted Sowers.

Epson Expression 836 XL Scanner with Adobe Photoshop version 5.5 ; image/jpeg, access ; 72 dpi ; 2 files: 15 K bytes, 17 K bytes Collected by Ted Sowers.

Epson Expression 836 XL Scanner with Adobe Photoshop version 5.5 ; image/jpeg, access ; 72 dpi ; 1 file: 21 K bytes Collected by Ted Sowers.

Epson Expression 836 XL Scanner with Adobe Photoshop version 5.5 ; image/jpeg, access ; 72 dpi ; 2 files: 19 K bytes, 20 K bytes Collected by Ted Sowers.

Epson Expression 836 XL Scanner with Adobe Photoshop version 5.5 ; image/jpeg, access ; 72 dpi ; 1 file: 20 K bytes Collected by Ted Sowers.

Epson Expression 836 XL Scanner with Adobe Photoshop version 5.5 ; image/jpeg, access ; 72 dpi ; 2 files: 18 K bytes, 19 K bytes Collected by Ted Sowers.

Epson Expression 836 XL Scanner with Adobe Photoshop version 5.5 ; image/jpeg, access ; 72 dpi ; 2 files: 21 K bytes, 21 K bytes Collected by Ted Sowers.

Epson Expression 836 XL Scanner with Adobe Photoshop version 5.5 ; image/jpeg, access ; 72 dpi ; 2 files: 21 K bytes, 21 K bytes Collected by Ted Sowers.

Epson Expression 836 XL Scanner with Adobe Photoshop version 5.5 ; image/jpeg, access ; 72 dpi ; 2 files: 22 K bytes, 22 K bytes Collected by Ted Sowers.

Epson Expression 836 XL Scanner with Adobe Photoshop version 5.5 ; image/jpeg, access ; 72 dpi ; 1 file: 19 K bytes Collected by Ted Sowers.