Browse Items (176 total)

image/tiff 2,973,528 bytes Church Ranch looking East.

image/tiff 4,424,538 bytes Located at 104th Avenue and Old Wadsworth Boulevard as it looked in 1867. Standing in the doorway are Mrs. Church and son Frank.

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image/tiff 2,173,423 bytes Sarah Henderson Church bottom right. Sarah Henderson Miller married George Henry Church in Independence, Iowa in 1861. The Churches? went to the Pikes Peak Country for their honeymoon. They started out with their ox team from Independence, Iowa and arrived in Denver 9 weeks later July 17, 1861.

image/tiff 9.909.830 bytes Sarah Henderson Church, John Frank Church on his horse Sheppie.

image/tiff 2,732,713 bytes Pigs at early Church Ranch.

image/tiff 5,893,038 bytes Left to right: Perry Sidway McKay, Katherine E. Church, Charles Church McKay.

image/tiff 2,102,125 bytes hand colored photo

image/tiff 8,975,106 bytes Farmer, Rancher and Land Developer. Marcus operated Church Ranch in Grand County with his wife Anne until 1949. He then joined his mother Katherine to operate Church Ranch in Jefferson County. He finalized the sale of land to the Atomic Energy Commission (approximately 1951); which then became the US Department of Energy's Rocky Flats Plant.

image/tiff 5,909,658 bytes Wife of John Frank Church. In 1925 John decided to try his hand at Gold mining in the four corners, Nuda, Naturita area. Katherine took over as business manager and became a well respected businesswoman. She was also the President of Mandalay Irrigation Co. Katherine and Ruth developed the first subdivision community in Jefferson County, known as Mandalay Gardens.

image/tiff 5,858,388 bytes John Frank Church was the only son of George & Sarah. John continued with the Cattle operation and built the Upper and Lower Church Lakes. Lower Church Lake can be seen from US 36 just north of the Church Ranch Blvd exit. Upper Church Lake is near Jefferson County Airport. Frank was also a state Senator and was a close friend of Buffalo Bill. Buffalo Bill frequently visited Church Ranch.

image/tiff 11,125,580 bytes Portrait of George Henry Church. George Henry Church came to Colorado in 1859 to investigate mining opportunities. Returning to Independence, Iowa, marrying Sarah Henderson Miller in 1861 and went to Pikes Peak Country for their honeymoon. The Church?s started out with their ox team arriving in Denver 9 weeks later, July 17, 1861. Bought and sold mining claims until 1864 when a small tract of land was purchased 13 miles northwest of Denver. Their entire life was spent at this spot which would now be known as Wadsworth Blvd. at 104th Ave. Firsts in Colorado History: 1866; Established first Stage Stop north of Denver, on road to Cheyenne. 1869; Introduced first Hereford Cattle to Colorado. 1873; Constructed first storage reservoir for irrigation purposes, with ten mile inlet ditch to bring water from Coal Creek Canyon. Lake became known as Church?s Upper Lake, and is now entirely surrounded by Jefferson County Airport property. 1890; Constructed first Trans-Continental water diversion water project. Water was picked up out of First Creek and Second Creek on western area of Berthoud pass, by open ditch and through a tunnel under Berthoud Pass. All construction was done by hand. This water was carried via Clear Creek on Eastern Slope to Church Ditch which headed at Golden, and carried to Church property near Broomfield. This water is now being used for domestic purposes by Golden residents. First to plant and successfully raise wheat in Colorado. 1880?s & 1890?s; annually drove cattle from the plains, over Rollins pass to western slope for summer grazing, returning in the fall. First they were grazed near Meeker on the White River, and later the 4-4 Ranch was established as head-quarters near Fraser in Middle Park. One of the early drives to the White River met with disaster, when in the fall it was decided to winter on the Blue River. Heavy snows and no winter feed reduced the herd from 1,750 to 250 head the following spring.
Realizing then that winter feed was a ?must?, the son John Frank Church about 1900 purchased from George and Humphrey Mc Queary their claims on the lower end of Willow Creek. Adding to his land, clearing and seeding to irrigated grasses the Church Ranch was established. A 16 mile ditch was constructed which provided irrigation water.

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image/tiff 9,462,244 bytes Rendering depicted by Barbara East. Aunt Etta arriving for the Holidays, being greeted by George Henry, Sarah, and John Frank Church.

image/tiff 9,872,090 bytes Charles Church McKay beside a road grader at Church Ranch development.

image/tiff 9,154,524 bytes Charles Church McKay as a young boy - 1949

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image/tiff 5,043,053 bytes 110 years ago, 11 men working to fill the Silos; the barn is still standing today (2006).

image/tiff 89,136,792 bytes Westminster, CO c 1952 showing the downtown area with the lumber yard North of railroad tracks, Fire Station #1 in the trees to the right (original site of Westminster?s first fire department), running East & West is 73rd Ave. with post office on the corner, the former Red & White Grocery among others, and the Westminster Grange Hall #184.

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Standley Lake:
Water has been called ?Liquid Gold.? To cities, towns and farms a water supply is the difference between success and failure. Standley Lake is named after O.J. Standley, a vice-president of Chicago Title and Trust. He was involved in financing immigrants to come to the United States and become farmers. He had a grand plan to build a 1000,000 acre feet lake that would be able to irrigate the many farms that were starting up in the area. His original plan was in the Barr Lake area. He was not able to fulfill his original plan. He met Thomas P. Croke who was recruiting Irish immigrants to work for the railroad. Mr. Croke held an interest in the Kinnear Reservoir which dates back to 1869 and the original plan of 100,000 acre feet lake was again alive by enlarging the Kinnear Reservoir and it would have the largest earth-filled dam. The project began.
The project began in 1902 with Joseph Standley, Thomas P. Croke and Milton Smith incorporating the Farmers Reservoir and Irrigation Company. The original plan to be revised down from 100,000 acre feet to 50,000 acre feet and the intention at the time was to raise the dam later to its full capacity. Construction began in 1907 and although problems concerning the stability of the dam were noted during construction the work went on and was completed in May of 1912.
In 1913 cracks began to appear in the dam, and a major slide occurred on the downstream face in 1914. This was repaired immediately. In 1916 there was another major slide, this time on the upstream face of the dam. This was not repaired until 1922.
It was not until an agreement with the Farmers Reservoir and Irrigation Company (FRICO) in 1963 gave Westminster 12,000 acre feet of storage in Standley Lake. This was Westminster?s first major water agreement.
This agreement was the beginning of several years of competition, distrust and lawsuits as Westminster competed with FRICO for Clear Creek Water .The February 16, 1972 issue of the Rocky Mountain News" A demand for utilities by tax-rich industry in northwest Jefferson and West Adams counties in 1970 kicked off the biggest and bitterest land war in recent Denver metropolitan history." The original dispute began with Westminster, Northglenn, and Broomfield over revenues from building industrial complexes that were in un-incorporated areas near Westminster. Westminster was the only one with enough water to serve new companies. There were two things that fueled this bitter dispute; each city's heavy investment in or desire for utilities and the Colorado annexation law. Commerce City and Arvada entered the dispute later. By 1971 Westminster had quelled most of the land battles. In 1978 FRICO and the City of Westminster sat down and settled the "Flip Flop Suit," giving Westminster the right to carry over unused water, thus increasing the City's water supply at no additional cost.
Today Standley Lake is not only Westminster?s water supply it is also a source of recreation.

image/tiff 1,552,600 bytes Shaw Heights subdivision located in Westminster, Colorado in the beginning stages in 1954. View is from the Pillar of Fire facing west. Shaw Heights was built on land where the Madison Orchards once were.

image/tiff 1,751,008 bytes Original Horse Barn on the Pillar of Fire Dairy Farm at 92nd Ave. and Huron St.

image/tiff 1,803,524 bytes Jasper & Sarah Rogers Pillar of Fire Farmhouse now on Pillar of Fire property moved to 3455 W. 83rd Ave. Originally the Pillar of Fire Farmhouse was located on the North West corner of 92nd Ave. and Huron Street. Jasper and Sarah ran the farm from 1955 to 1962.

image/tiff 4,296,072 bytes Ray Rogers on horseback in 1955 at the Rogers farm. Brittany Hill in the background with Huron Street is running in front of it.

image/tiff 58,689,816 bytes Jasper & Sarah Rogers wedding photo married in 1936. They lived at the Pillar of Fire farm site. Jasper was born on 1/9/1902 and passed away on 11/16/1962. After Jasper passed away Sarah married his brother Norman who lived from 1910 to 1996. The Rogers family traces their ancestry back to the Mayflower when Thomas Rogers and his son Joseph came over 1620.

image/tiff 60,817,138 bytes Top row: Jasper, Sarah.
Front row: Samuel, Joseph, Mary Ellen. Photo taken in 1944 befor Ray and baby boy were born.

image/tiff 57,154,836 bytes Sarah (Davis) Rogers in 1955 at the Rogers farm. Brittany Hill in the background with Huron Street is running in front of it.

image/tiff 60,690,282 bytes Sarah (Davis) Rogers Born 1/12/1914; Died 5/17/2004 at the age of 90.

image/tiff 60,774,756 bytes Jasper Rogers
Born 1/9/1902; Died 11/16/1962 at the age of 55.

image/tiff 54,669,428 bytes Jasper Rogers on the steps of Presidents House at Pillar of Fire. He was Alma Whites personal chauffer and assistant

image/tiff 37,727,669 bytes Katheryn and her family moved to Westminster in 1951 and she began working for the City of Westminster as a file clerk on a part-time basis. She was elected as Westminster City Clerk in 1953 and while elections are stressful for the candidate her children enjoyed election time as they got to make signs and were allowed to stay up late on election night. Later the position of Westminster City Clerk became an appointed position. During her time with the city she helped guide many City Managers, Council members, Mayors and citizens through the turbulent years of the City?s growth. Katheryn was one of the most knowledgeable City Clerks and helped organize the Colorado Municipal Clerk?s Association. She had the distinction of carrying the No. 1 badge for the Westminster Volunteer Fire Department and the No. 2 badge for the Westminster Police Department. The reason for the police badge was in case a woman had to be taken to Brighton to jail. The thought of having to do that was in-comprehensible to her as she couldn?t believe that ?those kinds of problems? happened in Westminster. Election Administrators form all over Colorado would call on her to help them with election rules. In addition to Katheryn was involved in the community and volunteered at Saint Anthony North Hospital and the Westminster Historical Society. She was always there to do what needed to be done with Jobs Daughters Bethel 18. She was a member of the Westminster Do-Ettes which is a community service group. Katheryn retired from the City of Westminster in 1975.

image/tiff 47,834,859 bytes Harvey and Erma England came to Westminster in 1938. The story is that he could not afford to build a house. He sent for plans from the agricultural department on how to build a structure to house chickens. He built that structure and that became their home for over 40 years. He was a very active volunteer in the community. He was a Westminster Volunteer Fireman. Harvey?s passion was the promotion of ?wholesome recreation for clean living for our young people.? In 1941 he organized an Old Timers Baseball and also an organization for the smaller boys to play summer baseball. He later organized a Santa Claus program to help provide Christmas gifts and fun for the children in our area that might not have Christmas. He also played Santa for the children and he would arrive on the fire truck. He was a volunteer Adams County Deputy Sheriff where he dealt with Juvenile delinquency. Harvey served on the Westminster Town Board for fourteen years and was the only person to serve as the Westminster Safety Commissioner. During his time on the Westminster Town Board he served on the Water Committee, the Street and Alley Committee and the Finance Committee. He was the first president of the Adams County Safety Council and for a number of years he supervised the active patrolling of streets and crosswalks in the vicinity of schools during the hours when children were coming and going to school. In May of 1951 Harvey and Erma organized Jobs Daughters Bethel 18 in Westminster.
Prior to 1953 Westminster did not have a Police Department and city employees doubled as marshals. In May of 1953 he was one of the original members of the Westminster Police Association. He resigned as a Westminster Town Board member in 1953 and ran for Mayor of Westminster. 1953 was a landmark for Westminster the population had reached 2,500 and making it possible to assume second class city status. Harvey was the first Mayor to our up graded city. One of Harvey?s dreams was to have a park for children to play and his dream came true when the City purchased 20 acres of land at 71st and Raleigh Street. A portion of this land would be used to build a filter plant but the land not needed became a park and it was named England Park in his honor. Harvey was the Mayor of Westminster from 1953 ? 1955.

image/tiff 45,765,400 bytes Malcolm J. "Jerry" O'Shea, Mayor of Westminster 1959 to 1961 and 1963 to 1965. Jerry came to Westminster in 1955. A native of Toledo, Ohio, he came to Colorado as a tuberculosis patient at the Jewish Consumptive Relief society {later American Medical Center) home on West Colfax, where he met and married Margaret "Peg' Roane. An article in the Denver Post quoted him as saying that while he had always been an avid reader, the time he spent in the hospital gave him a great deal of time to read, particularly to explore a new interest, government. He and his family moved to Westminster following his release from the hospital in 1955, and he immediately became involved in city government. ?After all my years of study I really got a bang out of participating in government" he was quoted as saying. O'Shea served as chairman of the Citizens Advisory Committee that advocated Home Rule, and was elected to his first term on City Council in November, 1957 and served on City Council until November, 1965. O'Shea was, according to those who worked closely with during those years, one of the most incisive thinkers and articulate speakers ever to have served on council, and credited him with providing much of the impetus for the City's progress over the years following the adoption of home rule. He was active in the Democratic Party, executive board chairman of the Urban Mayors Association and was twice elected an officer of the Colorado Municipal League. The Westminster and Colorado Jaycees named him "Outstanding Man of the Year" in 1961. O'Shea was also one of the primary instigators and backers of the Metropolitan Capital Improvements District formed in 1961 to allow for metropolitan cooperation in major capital improvements projects. Jerry O'Shea, never one to avoid a controversy was outspoken, intolerant of stupidity, quick to lash out at anyone who criticized his City or his fellow council members unfairly; honest, dedicated and sincere. He was in his element during "Youth in Government" Days when he urged the young people to participate in their government. Many people urged Jerry to return to City government during some of the crucial situations of the late 1960's and early 1970's, but he could not be persuaded, preferring to spend his time with his family and his job as senior analyst with the State Insurance Commission, a job he held at the time of his death in 1976.

image/tiff 60,452,608 bytes Dedication of time capsule buried at the site of the new Westminster Municipal Center on West 76th Ave. in 1961. [Capsule to be opened in 50 years.] Until 1960 this area was used as a sheep pasture by W.C. Walden who sold the property to the city. Pictured in photo: Viewers left to right; #1-Jacobson,Carl,#4-O'Shea, Jerry, #8-king, Paul, #10-England, Harvey;

image/tiff 60,384,453 bytes Bill Reeds, Director of Community Development in the 1970's

image/tiff 60,499,347 bytes Dan Montgomery, Chief of Police, City of Westminster, CO. began in 1982 the department numbered 152 employees, 100 of which were sworn police officers. With the new leadership provided by 19 year police veteran Dan Montgomery, the Westminster Police Department instituted a Suggestion Management System that launched a "participatory type of management' within the department. Explained Montgomery: "Good ideas are good ideas, and I want to hear them." The idea was so successful that it spread to all municipal departments. Montgomery was also responsible for refining the departments Career Development Rotational Program. Under the program, 12 to 15 positions considered "rotational" can be held by officers for three years. "The idea is to give as many people as possible a chance to try something different and get acquainted with other parts of department," said Chief Montgomery. "An officer can get burned out pushing a black-and-white on the streets year after year."

image/tiff 60,177,075 bytes Jerry Royther served as director of parks and recreation starting in 1978. 'We tried to balance parks around the City, building first in one quadrant, then another." The balancing act was difficult at times, he said, especially with twenty-eight subdivisions developing and everybody wanting their park first." Royther talks of development of parks, recreation centers and partnership with Hyland Hills Recreation District. Park names connection with Westminster, England.

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John Dutch, Fire Chief for the City of Westminster. In July of 1982 John Dutch was selected from many highly qualified candidates. John Dutch, Fire Chief, from Kettering, Ohio, for seven years, came to the department with years of experience coordinating paid and volunteer departments. Prior to Ohio he had served with the Las Vegas Fire Department where he had worked through the ranks from Firefighter to captain in the Training Division. He brought 17 years of experience with a combination of paid-volunteer force to Westminster. The benefit of this experience was that Chief Dutch brought new ideas to local firefighting, including the idea that volunteers should receive more rigorous training and work under more comprehensive guidelines. They would also make a more meaningful contribution. Under Chief Dutch, volunteers had to complete the 100-hour fire training academy, instead of absorbing entry level training over a period of one year. The volunteer recruit academy was the first of its kind in the State of Colorado. Instead of ?coming when called,? they had to sign up for 30 hours each month of Fire Station staffing, in six hour shifts. That put firefighters in duty at Volunteer Fire Stations 2 and 3 everyday from 6 p.m. to 6 a.m. the peak hours for fires. ?Our goal is to have volunteers with skills comparable to the paid members,? said Chief Dutch.

Jean Landis, Library Director. Jean was library director in 1979 when the library entered the computer age. The enormous task of entering the periodicals and books onto a computer data base was completed in 1983

image/tiff 59,413,466 bytes Original Cottonwood at the site of the First homestead of Westminster, that being of Pleasant DeSpain Sr. Located at 76th Ave. and Lowell Blvd. present location of Westminster United Methodist Church. The homestead house is gone however the original cottonwood that the DeSpain family planted over 100 years ago remains.

image/tiff 59,991,196 bytes "Memories from the Hometown Christmas Tree"
In 1923 when I was just 5 1/2 feet tall I was taken from my mountain home to Westminster and carefully planted in a public place for a special reason. I was to be the official town Christmas tree.
That first year almost half of the 500 hundred people that lived here came ot decorate me with strings of popcorn and cranberries. They sang songs and after I was decorated they went to carol to those that were not able to attend. I heard that I was the center of community spirit. A few years later there was a depression and many families in my town were having a very hard time. Even in the bad times I would be decorated every Christmas Season. There was time when I had a nativity scene at my base. In 1941 there were no lights or decorations because of World War II blackout laws. There were rodeos and picnics held in the park to give the children & the town a bit of recreation during a very hard time. In 1949 when I was 36 years old the Westminster Volunteer Fire Department placed a building near me in the park and soon there were other important town buildings added and I became a very prominent part of the landscape of the Westminster downtown. by the mid 1950's my role in the Christmas tradition seemed to be forgotten and I became the invisible tree. I had quite a scare in 1961 when a new City hall complex was built and they were going to tear down the old one and build a brand new Fire Station. There was serious talk about cutting me down to make way for the new Fire Station. I was saved by Laura Shipman, the person that brought me here in the first place and the new building was built wth a few alterations but I remained standing. In 1987 I became the Hometown tree once more thanks to the Westminster Historical Society. That year I had only a few strands of lights as the members of the historical society could only reach so far. The Shipman famaily was honored as they were the ones that planted me. There were not a lot of people that year but that was just fine as the tradition was once again established. During the next few years Leo Bryant, John Antol and Josef Lerch made wooden ornaments for me and the Westminster Fire Department began to decorate me from top to bottom. The wooden ornaments blew away years ago but each year when I am lit I feel as though I am once again the center of community spirit. There is a picket fence around my base with the names of all of those that have come to bring me to life each year. Each year those that are chosen to turn my lights on are long time Westminster residents. As I have grown from 5 1/2 feet to 65.5 feet the population of Westminster has grown has grown from 500 to 100,940.

image/tiff 2,896,620 bytes Rigg cherry orchards were located on the property of Sam and Alma Rigg at 7600 Bradburn Blvd. on 5 acres of land where they built their home in 1903. Mrs. Rigg was a pianist and gave lessons. At the age f 90 she enrolled in the University of Denver and became a successful writer. Her first article was about the cherry orchards.

sideA 5,284,151 bytes "audio/wav" KATHERYN HERMAN Katheryn and her family moved to Westminster in 1951 and she began working for the City of Westminster as a file clerk on a part-time basis. She was elected as Westminster City Clerk in 1953 and while elections are stressful for the candidate her children enjoyed election time as they got to make signs and were allowed to stay up late on election night. Later the position of Westminster City Clerk became an appointed position. During her time with the city she helped guide many City Managers, Council members, Mayors and citizens through the turbulent years of the City?s growth. She had the distinction of carrying the No. 1 badge for the Westminster Volunteer Fire Department and the No. 2 badge for the Westminster Police Department. The reason for the police badge was in case a woman had to be taken to Brighton to jail. The thought of having to do that was in-comprehensible to her as she couldn?t believe that ?those kinds of problems? happened in Westminster. Election Administrators form all over Colorado would call on her to help them with election rules. In addition to Katheryn was involved in the community and volunteered at Saint Anthony North Hospital and the Westminster Historical Society. She was always there to do what needed to be done with Jobs Daughters Bethel 18. She was a member of the Westminster Do-Ettes which is a community service group. Katheryn retired from the City of Westminster in 1975. RON HELLBUSCH Ron?s parents moved to Westminster in 1947. He graduated from Westminster High School and graduated from Hastings College in 1960. He began working for the City of Westminster in the summer of 1953 at age 15. His job was to mow lawns and take care of the park around City Hall which at that time was located on 73rd Avenue. It was not long before he was patching streets and hooking up water taps. He continued to work summers with the City and after he graduated from college he was hired on a full time basis. LEON WURL Leon came to Westminster in 1940 and began his career with the City of Westminster in 1951, serving as street and water superintendent, building inspector and chief of Police. In 1952 he was the youngest Chief of Police in the State of Colorado at age 21. Leon served on the Westminster City Council and a program initiated by Leon and approved by the City Council to plant Hopa Crab trees along the city?s right of ways to beautify the city.

sideA 12,873,637 bytes "audio/wav" sideB 12,875,282 bytes "audio/wav" KATHERYN HERMAN
Katheryn and her family moved to Westminster in 1951 and she began working for the City of Westminster as a file clerk on a part-time basis. She was elected as Westminster City Clerk in 1953 and while elections are stressful for the candidate her children enjoyed election time as they got to make signs and were allowed to stay up late on election night. Later the position of Westminster City Clerk became an appointed position. During her time with the city she helped guide many City Managers, Council members, Mayors and citizens through the turbulent years of the City?s growth. She had the distinction of carrying the No. 1 badge for the Westminster Volunteer Fire Department and the No. 2 badge for the Westminster Police Department. The reason for the police badge was in case a woman had to be taken to Brighton to jail. The thought of having to do that was in-comprehensible to her as she couldn?t believe that ?those kinds of problems? happened in Westminster. Election Administrators form all over Colorado would call on her to help them with election rules. In addition to Katheryn was involved in the community and volunteered at Saint Anthony North Hospital and the Westminster Historical Society. She was always there to do what needed to be done with Jobs Daughters Bethel 18. She was a member of the Westminster Do-Ettes which is a community service group. Katheryn retired from the City of Westminster in 1975.

RON HELLBUSCH
Ron?s parents moved to Westminster in 1947. He graduated from Westminster High School and graduated from Hastings College in 1960. He began working for the City of Westminster in the summer of 1953 at age 15. His job was to mow lawns and take care of the park around City Hall which at that time was located on 73rd Avenue. It was not long before he was patching streets and hooking up water taps. He continued to work summers with the City and after he graduated from college he was hired on a full time basis.

LEON WURL
Leon came to Westminster in 1940 and began his career with the City of Westminster in 1951, serving as street and water superintendent, building inspector and chief of Police. In 1952 he was the youngest Chief of Police in the State of Colorado at age 21. Leon served on the Westminster City Council and a program initiated by Leon and approved by the City Council to plant Hopa Crab trees along the city?s right of ways to beautify the city.

sideA 15,781,431 bytes sideB 14,070,985 bytes Jack Schofield moved to Westminster in 1939. Talks of Semper, Colorado[now part of Westminster] boundaries 88th to 112th Sheridan to Wadsworth.

sideA 19,827,694 bytes "audio/wav" Interview with Bess Traver, moved to Westminster about 1947 with Husband John L. Traver. John was Fire Chief -- Volunteer Fire Department Bess had 2 sisters that were teachers in Westminster -- Rosemary Brrescia art teacher -- Eleanor DePalma was music teacher Started the catholic church -- started in the basement of the Presbyterian Church -- bought land at 72nd & Irving -- Father Bernard Kelly came from St Anne's in Arvada

sideA 13,482,368 bytes "audio/wav" sideB 3,105,408 bytes "audio/wav" Notables mentioned; "Doc' Shipman, Peck Bean, George Losasso, Leo Cunningham, Tony Gunther, Ray Neilson, Mike Daley, Jerry O'Shea, Chet Sullivan, Bill Sokol, Carl Jacobson, Walt Tindal, Katheryn Herman, Bill Pare, Bill Frances, Jerry Smith, Dortha Abbott, Bob Joyner, Earle Towne, Guy Van Cleave, Leon Wurl, Earl Goodman, & Lee O'Brien. Places/Events: First Firehouse, fire equipment, rodeo, Davey Crockett Day [lake], Post Office, Penquin Drug Store, Farmers Highline Canal, Job?s Daughters, Grange, Gregory Hill, Police Department among others. Harvey and Erma England came to Westminster in 1937. The story is that he could not afford to build a house. He sent for plans from the agricultural department on how to build a structure to house chickens. He built that structure and that became their home for over 40 years. He was a very active volunteer in the community. He was a Westminster Volunteer Fireman. Harvey?s passion was the promotion of ?wholesome recreation for clean living for our young people.? In 1941 he organized an Old Timers Baseball and also an organization for the smaller boys to play summer baseball. He later organized a Santa Claus program to help provide Christmas gifts and fun for the children in our area that might not have Christmas. He also played Santa for the children and he would arrive on the fire truck. He was a volunteer Adams County Deputy Sheriff where he dealt with Juvenile delinquency. Harvey served on the Westminster Town Board for fourteen years and was the only person to serve as the Westminster Safety Commissioner. During his time on the Westminster Town Board he served on the Water Committee, the Street and Alley Committee and the Finance Committee. He was the first president of the Adams County Safety Council and for a number of years he supervised the active patrolling of streets and crosswalks in the vicinity of schools during the hours when children were coming and going to school. In May of 1951 Harvey and Erma organized Jobs Daughters Bethel 18 in Westminster.
Prior to 1953 Westminster did not have a Police Department and city employees doubled as marshals. In May of 1953 he was one of the original members of the Westminster Police Association. He resigned as a Westminster Town Board member in 1953 and ran for Mayor of Westminster. 1953 was a landmark for Westminster the population had reached 2,500 and making it possible to assume second class city status. Harvey was the first Mayor to our up graded city. One of Harvey?s dreams was to have a park for children to play and his dream came true when the City purchased 20 acres of land at 71st and Raleigh Street. A portion of this land would be used to build a filter plant but the land not needed became a park and it was named England Park in his honor. Harvey was the Mayor of Westminster from 1954 ? 1956.

Westminster Lions Club chartered in1948. Among the charter members was Carl Jacobson & Iver Ranum. Pictured in a 1949 photo are
Left to right: Everett Drumright, Fred Valente, Carl Hawkinson.

image/tiff 35,625,628 bytes Westminster's First Town Hall & Court House (1911 - 1913) was located at 7441 Bradburn Blvd. the original home of Fred Strawson. This building sat on the side of Fred Strawson's home and was his Real Estate & Insurance office also serving as the Town Hall. The Board met for the first time June 12, 1911, in Strawson?s office on Connecticut Ave. [Bradburn Blvd.]. At the first meeting, Strawson was appointed police magistrate. Strawson later served as Mayor. The building is now on the property of the Bowles House Museum at 3924 W. 72nd Ave